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Dr. Rafael Lara-Martinez Lectures About the Salvadoran Indigenous Language and Culture of the Nahuat-Pipil, Nov. 9 at TP/SS

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Transfer Information Session, Today, Monday, Nov. 5

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Scala Digital Signage Training Sessions Offered Nov. 14 and Dec. 12

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MC Events

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"Falling Into a Black Hole" in the Planetarium, Nov. 24

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New Art Exhibit "The Urge to Mark" in the King Street Gallery Works by Artist Craig Kraft

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Narrative Change Event Featuring MC Latino Student Voices, Nov. 16, at AFI

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Rockville Lions Friendship Night, Nov. 7

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Resumes and Cover Letters Workshop on Tues. Nov. 6!

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MC Votes November Update: Election Day Is Nov. 6 + Election Night Watch Party

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PILI Applications Now Being Accepted

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Mindful Mondays, Sept. 10 to Dec. 3

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Hold the Date for Debra Ritenour's Retirement Party, Tuesday, Nov. 13 at CT

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"Falling Into a Black Hole" in the Planetarium, Nov. 24

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Category: MC Events

Published: Nov 5 2018 5:33AM

On Saturday, 24 November 2018 at 7P.M. in the Planetarium of Montgomery College at the Takoma Park Silver Spring Campus we will explore falling into a black hole or black bubble.

Gravity bends light. If gravity is too strong it bends light completely. Gravity bends (distorts) not only space, but space-time. This planetarium show is a friendly introduction to the General Theory of Relativity suitable for general audiences. You do not have to know what the local metricization of Riemannian manifolds are to appreciate the basis and the results of the General Theory of Relativity. Black Bubbles are the most extreme results of this theory; some people also call these black bubbles, black holes, but bubbles capture a better picture of the events horizon and what really goes on there. They are literally Gravity to the Max. By looking at something in its most extreme case facets that are not revealed in mundane application like normal falling motion on the earth are shown.

The infinite time dilation (time asymmetry) between an outside the bubble observer and an observer who decides to visit the bubble are explained. Some of the other weird properties of Black Bubbles including resent observation of the vicinity of a black bubble in the center of our galaxy will be shared with the audience. Anyone with an inquiring mind and imagination of a typical third grader can enjoy this planetarium show. Those few people who do not want to flex (distort) or exercise (move) their mind are advised to stay home and watch mindless television so called reality shows, that are doubtless on at the same time on Saturday evening.

Image from http://www.spacetimetravel.org/expeditionsl/expeditionsl.html; of a simulated view of a black bubble (hole) in front of the Milky Way Galaxy. The black bubble is 10 solar masses so its Schwarzschild radius, event horizion radius, is 30 kilometers, and is viewed from a distance of 600 kilometers which is 200 Schwarzschild radii away and essentially Newtonian gravity at this far distance of 600 kilometers from the Bubble.

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